Music and curriculum


music notesMusic is a positive supplement to any curriculum.   Using music to enhance curriculum – especially in early childhood,  stimulates the brain’s neural coding which aids learning in later years.  Here are just a few of the ways music can enhance your classroom curriculum:

  • Singing encourages language development.  Music is generally processed on the right side of the brain and language on the left.  Singing involves both words and music and results in stimulating hemispheric interactions.
  • Music is not just for listening, but can be expounded upon the same way any good literature choice can.  In a study of preschoolers’ responses to auditory and vibroacoustic stimuli, J.M. Standley found that comprehension of literature was greatest for those students listening to the music-only version of the story.
  • Children can listen to music with eyes closed and create a picture in their minds. Writing about their picture enhances phonemic awareness and focus skills.
  • Singing favorite songs develops pitch and intonation skills required for vocal cord development, thereby improving oral language skills.
  • Discussing the meaning behind song lyrics is a positive way to develop higher order thinking skills.

How do you use music in your classroom or home?

Campbell, D. (1997). The Mozart effect: Tapping the power of music to heal the body, strengthen the mind, and unlock the creative spirit. New York, New York: Avon Books.

D’Agrosa, E. (2008). Making music, reaching readers: Making powerful connections possible for young students. General Music Today (Online), 21(2), 6-10.

Standley, J.M. (1992) Child development and music.  Psychology of Music,  Vol.20, pp. 80-85.

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